Leregogy

Leregogy is a new conception for adult learning theory, one that arises as an extension of the rich developments in the fields of pedagogy and andragogy. In a leregogical relationship, dualistic distinctions such as teacher-learner and mentor-mentee are replaced by learning as fluid, open-ended, with everyone leading, teaching, and learning together.

Meaning and origin

The term is a neologism that was generated by David Rehorick and Gail Taylor in 1995 to capture what they experienced within a learning adventure to expand their mutual understanding of phenomenology, phenomenological sociology, and hermeneutics.[1] “Leregogy is a term coined to try and bridge the indomitable severing of roles between teacher and learner.  It implies a transactional and shifting set of ‘roles’ wherein both people are, at various times and sometimes synchronously, both teachers and learners.  It also gets by the accepted term for adult learning (andragogy) which has its linguistic roots in maleness and the authoritarian role-sets implied by the term pedagogy.”[1] (p.411)

Leregogy has roots connected to the English verb “to learn”. “Lere” is derived from an obsolete English verb with roots in Old German, meaning, “to teach,” “to guide, lead,” and “to learn, study”.

While pedagogy and andragogy have rich and extensive socio-historical and intellectual trails, leregogy emerges beyond these traditions. Leregogy is an umbrella “conception” rather than a “concept”. A conception is a broader notion, referring to the act of conceiving or originating something.

The concept of leregogy more definitively arose as an extension of learner-centred, self-directed, adult graduate education at Fielding Graduate University, initially modelled on Malcolm Knowle’s concept of andragogy. Rogers (2019) indicates that faculty investigated and added “key concepts to Knowle’s initial conceptualization (that included) the importance of self direction (and) the role of mentoring” during the 45 year history of the university (p.14).[2] Snowden (2019) affirms that the university’s learner centered education is one where “faculty invite our students in from the periphery of their education into the co-inhabited learning core among their faculty”.[3] Bentz et al (2019) provide evidence that a leregogic education led to broad transformative learning impacts on Fielding students as expressed through more than 70 phenomenologically oriented doctoral dissertations, completed from 1996-2016.[4][5]

Development and Applications

The language of jazz idioms and improvisation has been used to capture the experience of adult learners on a transformative learning path. This offers fresh expression to the conception of leregogy moving beyond familiar notions such as pedagogy, andragogy, mentoring, advising, and peering.[6] Jeddeloh (2014) articulates five stages to the building of relationships: (1) discovering jazz as a common way of being, (2) mindful trust building, (3) just enough structure, (4) furthering the collaboration through the use of improvised languaging, and (5) playing in the moment, seeing the macro.[6] (p.84) His explorations suggest a new understanding of the learning processes inherent in the jazz and academic communities, wherein distinctions such as teacher and student fall away, and learning happens in relation to others in performance.

Rehorick and Rehorick (2016) discuss the presence of leregogical relationships within university curricula in relation to the development of a new Japanese educational program at the Miyazaki International College established in Japan.[7] The authors describe how their co-teaching efforts delivering an integrated content-based language learning curriculum led to a seamless blend of content and language objectives such that a classroom observer could not distinguish the content from the language specialist. By fostering a view of learning as a relational endeavour, old dualisms such as student-teacher and mentor-mentee can be transcended, with classroom participants assuming varying roles within daily classroom activities.[7] (pp. 144-45, 156-57)

Marlatt and Bentz (2019) describe the positive impact of a leregogic teaching practice on over 60 students participating in a multi-national multi-institutional research project between Fielding Graduate University, University of the Virgin Islands, and University of Łódź. The project focused on raising consciousness through transformative phenomenology.[8]

Phenomenological scholar-practitioners describe the impact of a leregogic doctoral education contributing to positive transformation of self, others and society.[9][10] Refer to Knobel, Clarke, Laberge, Schneider, Nishii, Cotter-Lockard, and Wilson & Wilson in Further Reading for examples.

References

  1. Rehorick, David & Taylor, Gail (1995). Thoughtful incoherence: First encounters with the phenomenological-hermeneutical domain. Human Studies 18(4), 389-414. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/BF01318619
  2. Rogers, C. R. (2019). Introduction. In C. R. Rogers & M. L. Snowden (Eds.), The Fielding Scholar Practitioner (pp. 13-21). Santa Barbara: Fielding Press.
  3. Snowden, M. L. (2019). Learner-Centered Graduate Education. In C. R. Rogers & M. L. Snowden (Eds.), The Fielding Scholar Practitioner (pp. 108-115). Santa Barbara: Fielding Press.
  4. Bentz, V., Rehorick, D., Marlatt, J., Nishii, A., Estrada, C., & Buechner, B. (2019). The Silver Age of Phenomenology at Fielding Graduate University. In K. S. Rogers & M. L. Snowden (Eds.), The Fielding Scholar Practitioner: Voices from 45 years of Fielding Graduate University (pp. 179-204). Santa Barbara, CA: Fielding Press.
  5. Completed HOD Dissertations (1996-2016): Phenomenological and/or Hermeneutic Inquiry In D. Rehorick & V. Malhotra Bentz (Eds.), Expressions of phenomenological research: Consciousness and lifeworld studies, Appendix B, (pp. 303-308). Santa Barbara, CA: Fielding University Press.
  6. Jeddeloh, Steven (2014). A phenomenological account of improvised collaborative transformation: Explicating relationship through jazz as idiom. In A. Nicolaides and D. Holt (Eds.), Spaces of transformation and transformation of space. Proceedings of the XI International Transformative Learning Conference, Teachers College,Columbia University, New York, October 2014, pp. 83-87.
  7. Rehorick, David & Rehorick, Sally (2016). The leregogy of curriculum design: Teaching and learning as relational endeavours. In A. Tajino, T. Stewart & D. Dalsky (Eds.), Team teaching and team learning in the language classroom: Collaboration for innovation in ELT (pp. 143-163). London: Routledge. https://www.routledge.com/Team-Teaching-and-Team-Learning-in-the-Language-Classroom-Collaboration/Tajino-Stewart-Dalsky/p/book/9781138576001
  8. Marlatt, J., & Bentz, V. M. (2019). Transformative Phenomenology: Collaboration Among Strangers Based on Writing Phenomenological Protocols. Paper presented at the 2019 Society for Phenomenology and the Human Sciences (SPHS) Annual Conference, Pittsburgh, PA.
  9. Rehorick, D. A., & Bentz, V. (Eds.). (2008). Transformative phenomenology: Changing ourselves, lifeworlds, and professional practice. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books.
  10. Rehorick, D., & Bentz, V. (Eds.). (2017). Expressions of phenomenological research: Consciousness and lifeworld studies. Santa Barbara, CA: Fielding University Press.

Further reading

  • Shirley G. Knobel (2017). Leadership and the Lifeworld of Nelson Mandela: A Hermeneutic-Phenomenological Inquiry. In D. Rehorick & Bentz (Eds.), Expressions of phenomenological research: Consciousness and lifeworld studies(pp. 81-102). Santa Barbara, CA: Fielding University Press.
  • Jo-Anne Clarke (2017). The Lifeworld of Sustainability Entrepreneurs: A Schutzian Exploration of Women’s Experience The transformative potential of conversations with strangers. In D. Rehorick & V. Malhotra Bentz (Eds.), Expressions of phenomenological research: Consciousness and lifeworld studies(pp. 103-122). Santa Barbara, CA: Fielding University Press.
  • Carol G. Laberge (2017). Understanding Patients’ Experience of Heart Attack: Phenomenological Lessons for Nurses and other Practitioners. In D. Rehorick & V. Malhotra Bentz (Eds.), Expressions of phenomenological research: Consciousness and lifeworld studies(pp. 123-148). Santa Barbara, CA: Fielding University Press.
  • Lori K. Schneider (2017). Re-Placing Myself: Perspectives on the Experience of Work/Home/Life Place. In D. Rehorick & V. Malhotra Bentz (Eds.), Expressions of phenomenological research: Consciousness and lifeworld studies(pp. 149-177). Santa Barbara, CA: Fielding University Press.
  • Ayumi Nishii (2017). The Experience of Heideggerian Hermeneutical Methodology: Round Dance of Servanthood, Philosophy, and Myself. In D. Rehorick & V. Malhotra Bentz (Eds.), Expressions of phenomenological research: Consciousness and lifeworld studies. (pp. 178-208). Santa Barbara, CA: Fielding University Press.
  • Dorianne Cotter-Lockard (2017). Studying Collaboration among Chamber Musicians: Phenomenological Inspirations and Insights. In D. Rehorick & V. Malhotra Bentz (Eds.), Expressions of phenomenological research: Consciousness and lifeworld studies. (pp. 209-235). Santa Barbara, CA: Fielding University Press.
  • Michael Wilson and Ann Wilson (2017). Rising Sun: Actioning Hermeneutic Phenomenological Inquiry for Community Based Social Innovation. In D. Rehorick & V. Malhotra Bentz (Eds.), Expressions of phenomenological research: Consciousness and lifeworld studies(pp. 236-271). Santa Barbara, CA: Fielding University Press.Bentz,V., Rehorick, D., Marlatt, J., Nishii, A., & Estrada, C. (2018). Transformative phenomenology as an antidote to technological deathworlds. Schutzian Research, 10, pp. 189-220.
  • James Marlatt (2017). The transformative potential of conversations with strangers. In D. Rehorick & V. Malhotra Bentz (Eds.), Expressions of phenomenological research: Consciousness and lifeworld studies(pp. 45-80). Santa Barbara, CA: Fielding University Press. pp. 47-48.
  • Rehorick, D. Jeddeloh, S. & Lau-Kwong, K. (2014). At the boundary of transformative learning: Empirical, phenomenological, and conceptual insights. In A. Nicolaides and D. Holt (Eds.), Spaces of transformation and transformation of space(pp. 81-93). Proceedings of the XI International Transformative Learning Conference, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, October 2014. https://drive.google.com/file/d/0By1yh67DPBk-R3JQS01SYmM4WjZFbUJPeU9raS12WTlubWVR/view?pli=1

External links

https://www.etymonline.com/word/lere

https://www.yourdictionary.com/lere


© David Rehorick & James Marlatt, 2020

Please Share with Attribution: Rehorick, D. A. and Marlatt, J. (2020). Definition of Leregogy. Retrieved from https://transformative-phenomenology-and-us.home.blog

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license.